How to claim no claim bonus on new car insurance

If the car buyer has earned a no-claim bonus (NCB) on his previous car policy, this can be claimed on the insurance premium for the new car.

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The latest Insurance Information Institute (Triple-I) research indicates that between 2013 and 2022, economic and social inflation fueled a $96 to $105 billion increase in combined claim payouts for U.S. personal and commercial auto insurer liability.  

The report “Impact of Increasing Inflation on Personal and Commercial Auto Liability Insurance” outlines Triple-I’s continued exploration of the impact of social inflation on insurer costs and claim payouts. The study proposes that increasing inflation drove loss and DCC (defense containment costs) higher in both insurance lines– by 6.5 percent ($61 billion) of total loss and DCC for personal auto and by 19 to 24 percent ($35 to $44 billion) for commercial auto. 

Key Takeaways 

  • Estimates place the average annual impact of increasing inflation at 0.6 percent for personal auto and 2.7 percent for commercial auto. 
  • The accident rate (claim frequency) declined, and claim severity (size of losses) increased dramatically for personal and commercial lines. 
  • Increasing inflation was mainly driven by social inflation factors before 2021, and since that year, it has continued as a product of economic and social inflation. 

Researchers Jim Lynch, FCAS, MAAA, Triple-I’s former chief actuary, Dave Moore, FCAS, MAAA, president, Moore Actuarial Consulting, LLC, and Dale Porfilio, FCAS, MAAA, Triple-I’s chief insurance officer, approached the topic in a manner similar to their prior collaborations (in 2022 and early 2023). They used loss development patterns to identify inflation for selected property/casualty lines in excess of inflation in the overall economy. However, they extended their methodology in this project to use annual statement data through year-end 2022. Also, in this report, the authors use the term “inflation” for the first time to convey the operative mix of social and economic inflation on insurers’ costs. 

Commercial Auto Liability 

Data indicates that commercial auto liability faces its share of challenges, too, as losses have outpaced the growth rate of the overall economy. Claim severity (size of losses) has risen 72 percent overall since 2013, with the median annual increase at 6.3 percent. The report compares this change to the annual median increase of 2.1 percent in the Consumer Price Index, an observation offered as evidence that before 2020, social inflation may have been a primary factor in loss trends.  

Researchers estimate that from 2013 to 2022, increasing inflation drove losses up by between $35 billion and $44 billion, or between 19 percent and 24 percent. The pandemic brought significant change to commercial auto liability, decreasing claim frequency while increasing claim severity more dramatically. Researchers contend the loss development factors for this line of business signal an ongoing problem of inflationary factors. 

Personal Auto Liability 

This line took in four times the net earned premiums in 2022 as commercial auto liability. However, multimillion-dollar personal auto settlements are rare; consequently, the cases have less impact on insured losses or development patterns. Premiums and insurer losses in this line fluctuated over the prior two decades but continue to increase, albeit more slowly than the overall economy. In recent years, however, losses have been growing faster than premiums. Since 2020, premiums fell 13 percent, while losses rose 15 percent. And, after 2019, severity increased dramatically, with the compound annual increase holding 3.0 percent from 2013 to 2019, then tripling to 9.2 percent compounded annually. 

 
The double whammy of economic inflation and social inflation 

The report describes the nuanced findings of personal and commercial auto liability –understandably different as these markets differ in many aspects, including size and risk factors. The analysis reveals some trends in common, however. Findings in commercial and personal auto liability indicate that the overall accident rate (claim frequency) declined during the early pandemic years, yet the severity (size of losses) increased more dramatically.  

The earliest study in this series looked at insurance trends through the end of 2019, focusing on loss development factors (LDFs). Since economic inflation was stable, but LDFs were increasing steadily during that time, the researchers concluded that economic inflation was likely not the cause of rising costs. Then, beginning in 2021, a sizable uptick in the CPI-All Urban signaled a rise in overall economic inflation.  

The resulting implications for underlying insurer costs can be observed in factors that impact claim payouts, such as replacement costs. The report states that since 2008, replacement costs for commercial and personal auto insurance have outpaced overall prices in the economy by 40 percent. Since 2019, these costs have risen almost three times faster than prices overall. Thus, for the years prior, researchers continue to attribute the bulk of losses for both lines primarily to social inflation but propose that social inflation and increasing overall economic inflation share the credit beginning in 2020. 

Triple-I plans to continue to foster a research-based conversation around social inflation. For an overview of the topic and other helpful resources about its potential impact on insurers, policyholders, and the economy, check out our knowledge hub, Social inflation: hard to measure, important to understand.  

When a policyholder purchases an insurance policy, he receives an NCB certificate, and it is now up to him whether or not he files any claims within the policy year.

By Max Dorfman, Research Writer, Triple-I

Most consumers believe the majority of personal insurance rating factors that insurers use to underwrite and price homeowners and auto coverage are fair, according to a new survey by the Insurance Research Council (IRC) – like Triple-I, an affiliate of The Institutes.

But there was some variation regarding which variables they consider fair.

Overall, consumers were more favorable toward factors they perceived to be directly related to the risk of the insured property (condition of the home, cost of rebuilding, miles driven, vehicle information, etc.). They were less likely to rank fair on aspects connected to the insured’s personal profile.

The study, Public Perceptions Regarding the Fairness of Insurance Rating Factors, focused on homeowners and personal auto insurance. IRC found that all 19 homeowners insurance rating factors were assessed to be fair by most respondents, and the majority deemed 10 of the 14 personal auto factors.

Insurance companies use statistically predictive rating variables to assess risk and determine policy prices, helping to accurately align premiums with risk and offer coverage to higher-risk consumers. The variables consider several socioeconomic factors to determine these coverage costs, including gender, age, education, and credit-based insurance scores.

“Given how inflation and other factors have driven up the cost of auto and homeowners insurance in recent years, IRC was not surprised to learn that paying for these essential coverages has been a financial burden for a sizable number of Americans,” said IRC president and Triple-I chief insurance officer Dale Porfilio.  “Yet, at the same time, consumers expressed widespread support in our survey for the fairness of the rating factors used by insurance carriers to price their auto and homeowners policies.”

Among personal auto factors, those most likely to be deemed fair included:

  • Traffic conviction record;
  • Driver’s loss/claim history; and
  • Driving behavior data from telematics.

However, the personal auto factors that were least likely to be considered fair were:

  • Education level;
  • Marital status; and
  • Gender of the driver.

Concerning homeowners insurance, the most fair factors included:

  • The use of safety systems
  • Condition of home; and
  • The estimated cost of rebuilding.

Least agreeable factors for homeowners involved:

  • Credit history;
  • Condition of surrounding building; and
  • The data from a connected device.

Previous IRC research that focused on consumer attitudes about the use of credit history as an insurance rating factor found that skepticism about the link between credit and future insurance claims declines when the predictive power of credit-based insurance scores is explained to them.

Bajaj Allianz General Insurance Comprehensive Car Insurance stands out for its high claims settlement ratio and hassle-free renewals.

By Kris Maccini, Head of Digital Distribution, Triple-I

Dale Sharpe Jenkins, M.S., CIC, AINS, principal/owner, The Jenkins Agency Incorporated, is quick to point out that she didn’t choose a career in insurance – insurance chose her. A first-generation college graduate, Jenkins sought a profession that would provide her and her family with opportunities. She began her career in life insurance at a small company in Columbus, Ohio before moving on to Progressive Insurance and opening its first claims office in Phoenix, Arizona. 

“Insurance plays an important role in our lives. The insurance industry has allowed me to make a great living and help people with their needs at the same time.” 

Eventually, Jenkins moved into a senior construction underwriter position at St. Paul Insurance Companies (now Travelers) and made the shift from claims to underwriting. While it was a rewarding position, Jenkins started a family and wanted more flexibility in her career. In 1998, she leveraged her experience in construction to build The Jenkins Agency Incorporated, an independent agency based in Arlington, Texas, specializing in commercial underwriting for construction, religious organizations, and other non-profits. 

“We write property/casualty, life, health, and group benefits. Most of our customers are small Black-owned businesses, and we are minority certified. I’m proud of what our agency has been able to do for the Black business community. Their success is our success.” 

Diversity has been at the epicenter of Jenkins’ career. The Dallas Black Chamber has recognized the agency for its work in the Black community; the Dallas-Fort Worth (DFW) Airport named The Jenkins Agency Incorporated as its Diversity Champion of 2023 at the SOAR Awards this year; and Business Insurance Magazine has also acknowledged the agency for its diversity efforts.  

In 2008, Jenkins joined the National African American Insurance Association (NAAIA), where she was a member of the founding Board of Directors and served as president of the Dallas chapter for three years. Since 2011, the NAAIA DFW Scholarship Foundation has provided financial awards to high school and college students interested in careers in insurance, finance, and marketing. 

“I’m very focused on providing [insurance] industry awareness to young people starting out or trying to discover a career for themselves. I was on the receiving end early in my career, and it’s nice to give back now.” 

The Jenkins Agency Incorporated celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. Reflecting on the past two decades, Jenkins feels blessed to be in her current position. She founded her company on her own without a book of business and built it from the ground up, relying on referrals. Her husband, Jeff, joined the business in 2000. 

“In the early years, we were in survival mode. We realized if we could make it to five years, we could make it to 10. Hiring our first employees was a highlight, and most of them have been with us for over a decade.” 

Like every small business, The Jenkins Agency experienced challenges in its initial years. Jenkins remembers the difficult transition from working in a large company to running her own business and maintaining a work/life balance. 

“Whether working for yourself or others, flexibility is very important when you are working and raising a family. Having my own business granted me that flexibility. I was able to work around my daughters’ schedules and still manage responsibilities at the office. Having your own business doesn’t mean you work less; in my experience, you work more but with the advantage is being able to manage your day.” 

To this day, Jenkins cites her two daughters as inspiration, along with other up-and-coming professionals. Both of her daughters have successful careers–her youngest daughter as a risk manager for a municipality in Texas and her oldest daughter as a business owner in California and a college professor. Entrepreneurship runs in the family. Jenkins’ father was also a business owner.  

Jenkins, who teaches risk management at the University of Texas in Arlington, is also motivated by her students. “My inspiration comes from the younger generation and how they embrace diversity and balance work and home. I’m also impressed with their talent.” 

Regarding the ongoing efforts to push for diversity, equity, and inclusion in the industry, Jenkins is cheering on this generation and asks young Black professionals not to lose ground.  

“My generation had to maneuver in a different way. We tried to fit in in any way we could–from hair to speech. This generation has a voice, and they are not afraid to be heard. To them I say…Keep your skills sharp so there is no question whether you can do the job and be proud of who you are.” 

Looking to participate in discussions around addressing disparities and working towards a more inclusive and equitable insurance landscape? Sign up for Empowering the Community: The Importance of Insurance in the Black Community, hosted on September 12 by The Black Insurance Industry Collective (BIIC).

Dale Sharpe Jenkins, M.S., CIC, AINS is an academic member of the Insurance Information Institute through her affiliation with the University of Texas at Arlington. 

By Mary Sams, Senior Research Analyst, Triple-I

Impact Re Ltd. – a member-owned captive fronted by Zurich North America – brings together companies from a variety of industries that share an interest in both risk management and sustainable business practices.

The captive is a partnership between Zurich North America and Innovative Captive Strategies (ICS). In addition to being one of the largest providers of commercial insurance products and services in the United States and Canada, Zurich North America is part of global insurer Zurich Insurance — a company widely recognized for its commitment to sustainability. 

Group captives enable companies with similar risk profiles to reduce their insurance costs by pooling risk and simplifying risk management. Typical structures include committees managing risk control, finance, and underwriting.  Impact Re adds a sustainability committee and will offer members greater control and management of auto, general liability, and workers compensation programs, as well as providing access to management services focused on sustainability from Zurich Resilience Solutions (ZRS).

ZRS will conduct a sustainability assessment of the member company’s carbon footprint and energy consumption. The assessment is not designed to exclude non-conforming companies from membership but to provide baseline data against which members can measure their progress toward their own sustainability goals. The objective is to quantify the business benefits of sustainability and communicate those benefits to stakeholders.

Impact Re is among the winners announced in the Business Insurance 2023 Innovation Awards.

Learn More:

Group Captives Offer Cost-Sensitive Companies Opportunities to Save in Face of Inflation

Pandemic Fuels Growth in Captive Insurance

Triple-I Paper Takes a Detailed Look at Member-Owned Group Captives

In India, road tax is levied by both the Centre and state governments. However, road tax is essentially a state-level tax since the cost of maintenance of local roads is borne by the state governments. Road tax can be paid both offline and online in India. Vehicle owners must note that without producing an active vehicle insurance policy, individuals are not allowed to make road tax payments.

Add-on covers are usually additional benefits that you can add to your comprehensive car insurance policy by paying an extra amount. To protect different parts of your car, there are specific add-on covers. If you don’t understand what part of your car is protected by which add-on cover and jumbled them up while filing an auto insurance claim, your insurance company may refuse to bear the cost. To solve this, Bajaj Allianz General Insurance has come up with a new motor insurance plan that offers a plethora of add-on covers together. Let’s understand how it works